Chesapeake Quarterly
July 2013 • Volume 12, Number 2
Robert Reynolds, a USGS scientist, is touring the Smithsonian Institution’s amphibian and reptile collection housed in an annex in Suitland, Maryland. Well over half a million animals make up this collection, with specimens from the 1800s to the present — a testament to North America's rich biodiversity. But in the wilds of Maryland many of these same creatures are vanishing at an alarming rate.   more . . .
Even tiny animals living in bay-grass beds play an important role in the health of the Chesapeake, says Emmett Duffy, a marine scientist at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Is their diversity also a factor?   more . . .
Just like people, wild celery plants aren’t all alike. Each plant carries a unique combination of genes. The variety within a species of bay grass could play a key role in its restoration and survival, researchers say.
more . . .
In 1919, a self-confident and single-minded man, better known in his youth for his charm and his lacrosse than for his science, carried a borrowed microscope to a fish shack on a creek north of Solomons, Maryland. By 1929, Reginal Truitt had persuaded the Maryland governor and legislature to approve the first marine lab in Maryland, the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory in Solomons.   more . . .
Does forest biodiversity matter? And can diverse forests improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay? A Smithsonian Environmental Research Center study, one of the largest biodiversity experiments of its kind, aims to answer these questions.   more . . .
Douglas Lipton, director of Maryland Sea Grant’s Extension team, has stepped down to pursue a new opportunity. He is now the senior research economist at the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service.   more . . .
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