Chesapeake Quarterly Volume 3, Number 4: Video Spotlights
[Chesapeake Quarterly masthead]
2004
Volume 3, Number 4
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Video Spotlights

The quality of the video depends on the speed of your connection to the Internet. The length of each video is given in minutes and seconds (mm:ss). We appreciate your comments about each of the videos.

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You can also watch these videos on Maryland Sea Grant's YouTube Channel.



Striped bass grown in an aquaculture tank

Problem-Solving Science Teaching [5:21]
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Can students raise striped bass in their high school and middle school classrooms? Only if they can tackle and solve a slew of research questions and technical problems, ranging from water quality to food supply to fish disease. At South Carroll High School, science teacher Bob Foor-Hogue set up aquaculture projects for his students and the result was a pioneering, problem-solving approach to science education. Working with Foor-Hogue Sea Grant educators Adam Frederick and Jackie Takacs are now exporting his approach and their fish to other schools around the state.

Scott McIntosh talking about teaching aquaculture in the classroom

In Their Own Words [3:21]
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Teachers have to learn before they can teach, and if they are going to teach aquaculture they have a lot to learn. Bob Foor-Hogue of South Carroll High School and Adam Frederick of Maryland Sea Grant Extension have been organizing summer workshops for teachers since 1998. They claim an aquaculture project is one of the best ways to get American students to plug into serious science. Here's what some of the teachers who plugged into the workshop have to say about the experience.

Adam Frederick with two students examining the wildlife

The Case for Environmental Education [2:23]
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When Adam Frederick taught high school biology he got his students into science by getting them out of the classroom - out into the woods and fields and streams where they could see biology at work. Environmental science leads to better scores in science, according to Frederick, now a Marine Science Educator with Maryland Sea Grant Extension. And it's a teaching tool that can be used across all disciplines.



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